The pandemic has disrupted childhood vaccinations, dropping by 11 million doses in the past year: CDC director

  • Childhood vaccinations have declined by 11 million doses during the pandemic, says CDC director.
  • Coronavirus vaccines have not yet been authorized for children under 16 in the US.
  • Dr. Fauci said kids under 12 will be ‘very likely’ to get coronavirus vaccine in early 2022.
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Childhood vaccinations have declined during the pandemic, according to CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky.

“During the pandemic, we have seen substantial declines in pediatrician visits.  And because of this, CDC orders for childhood vaccinations dropped by about 11 million doses — a substantial and historic decline,” said Walensky during a White House briefing on Friday.

In May, the CDC released a study that showed that childhood vaccines administered in Michigan dropped 22% in the pandemic.

Coronavirus vaccines have not been authorized for children under 16 in the US so far, but Dr. Fauci said kids under 12 will be ‘very likely’ to get the coronavirus vaccine in early 2022.

Modern’s CEO Stephane Bancel announced in January that the company will begin studying the Covid-19 vaccine in young children soon, but data most likely won’t be available until 2022. Bancel added that Moderna is aiming to have the vaccine approval extended to adolescents ages 12 and older by this summer, so they can be vaccinated before returning to middle and high school in September.

Within his first 100 days, President Biden said he wants to reopen K-8 schools safely and quickly. On March 11, Biden signed the $1.9 trillion stimulus bill that includes $130 billion to help schools open.

As government officials work to get children back to school, Walensky tells parents to make sure their children are up to date on their vaccines.

“This pandemic has taken so much from us already.  We must work together to protect our children’s health now and in the future,” Walensky said.

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