Asia-Pacific stocks muted after Dow and S&P 500 close at record highs

  • Shares in Asia-Pacific were muted in Friday morning trade.
  • The Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 closed at record highs on Wall Street.
  • Australia's capital Canberra entered a week-long lockdown on Thursday after a Covid-19 case was identified in the community.

SINGAPORE — Shares in Asia-Pacific were muted in Friday morning trade after the Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 closed at record highs overnight on Wall Street.

In Japan, the Nikkei 225 dipped fractionally while the Topix index traded slightly higher. South Korea's Kospi shed 0.11%.

Over in Australia, the S&P/ASX 200 edged nearly 0.1% higher as investors watched the coronavirus situation, with the country's capital Canberra entering a week-long lockdown on Thursday after a Covid-19 case was identified.

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Overnight on Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 14.88 points to 35,499.85 while the S&P 500 gained about 0.3% to 4,460.83. The Nasdaq Composite advanced 0.35% to 14,816.26.

Currencies and oil

The U.S. dollar index, which tracks the greenback against a basket of its peers, was at 92.986 — above levels below 92.9 seen earlier in the week.

The Japanese yen traded at 110.38 per dollar, weaker than levels below 110.20 seen against the greenback earlier this week. The Australian dollar changed hands at $0.7339, off levels above $0.736 seen earlier in the trading week.

Oil prices were lower in the morning of Asia trading hours, with international benchmark Brent crude futures slipping 0.25% to $71.13 per barrel. U.S. crude futures shed 0.28% to $68.90 per barrel.

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