European markets set for muted open with inflation data, earnings on the agenda

  • Investors will be monitoring a raft of inflation data from the U.K. and the euro zone on Wednesday morning, looking for hints as to how central banks will move in the coming months.
  • Earnings before the bell come from Sage, British Land and Experian, among others.

LONDON — European markets are set for a lackluster open on Wednesday as investors await inflation readings from the euro zone and continue to monitor corporate earnings releases.

Britain's FTSE 100 is seen around 24 points lower at 7,303, Germany's DAX is expected to lose around 23 points to 16,225 and France's CAC 40 is set to open roughly flat at 7,153, according to IG data.

Shares in Asia-Pacific declined overnight as Japan's export growth slowed to an eight-month low, sending shares of automakers lower.

U.S. stock futures were little changed in early premarket trading on Wednesday as investors geared up for earnings reports from big-box retailers Target and Lowe's. Markets stateside received a boost on Tuesday from strong retail sales data and industrial production figures.

Back in Europe, investors will be monitoring a raft of inflation data from the U.K. and the euro zone on Wednesday morning, looking for clues as to how central banks will move in the coming months.

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Earnings before the bell come from Sage, British Land and Experian, among others.

Bitcoin will also be on the radar after the world's largest cryptocurrency dipped below $60,000 on Tuesday, taking losses since its Nov.10 record high to more than 12%.

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