Heinz ketchup, Lanson champagne, other favorites of the Queen may have to change branding

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The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II arrives in London, where it will be taken to Buckingham Palace

The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II arrives in London, where it will be taken to Buckingham Palace

Heinz ketchup, Lanson champagne, and hundreds of other companies that were granted a warrant by Queen Elizabeth II to display the royal coat of arms may have to reapply after the Queen died last week. 

More than 600 Royal Warrants were issued by the Queen during her 70-year reign, according to the Royal Warrant Holders Association. 

Bottles of Heinz Tomato ketchup in a store in the United Kingdom.  (Education Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images / Getty Images)

Businesses that regularly supply products or services to the Royal Household can apply for a warrant, which entitles the holders to use the coat of arms on their branding. 

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"Royal Warrant holders receive a handsome Royal Warrant document and the right to display the appropriate Royal Arms on their product, packaging, stationery, advertising, premises and vehicles in accordance with The Lord Chamberlain's Rules," the Royal Warrant Holders Association explains. 

A spectator enjoys some Lanson champagne during day six of the 2022 Wimbledon Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, Wimbledon.  (Steven Paston/PA Images via Getty Images / Getty Images)

When the grantor of the warrant dies, any company that was granted a warrant may continue using the coat of arms for two years, but the new monarch will review the grants. 

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Queen Elizabeth II, Britain's longest reigning monarch, died on Thursday at Balmoral Castle in Scotland at the age of 96. 

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