Company vows support for employees who give birth in response to employers covering abortion costs

video

Gov. Kristi Noem shares impact Supreme Court’s abortion ruling has in her state

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem talks state’s trigger law and other abortion crackdowns following the Supreme Court’s landmark decision on ‘Fox Business Tonight.’

Buffer Insurance condemned "secular" companies' response to the end of Roe v. Wade, vowing instead to support female employees who get pregnant and even cover the costs of giving birth.

The Texas-based company vowed to offer maternity and paternity leave to employees who have children, as well as cover the costs of their female employees giving birth. The company also promised to help out employees seeking to adopt children.

"Secular companies are paying the travel costs for employees to abort babies out-of state," Buffer wrote in a Facebook post. "Today we are announcing that Buffer will pay the costs for our employees who birth babies."

"Employers: If you’d like to learn how you can provide these benefits to your employees, let us know. We have ready-to-use policies you can add to your employee handbooks," the company continued.

ALASKA AIRLINES, DICK'S SPORTING GOODS, JPMORGAN, DISNEY AND OTHERS COVERING TRAVEL COSTS FOR ABORTIONS

The move comes as many companies have condemned the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe. Some have gone so far as to cover the costs of their female employees working in Republican-controlled states who need to cross state lines to get an abortion.

LIZZO AND LIVE NATION JOIN FORCES AND PLEDGE $1 MILLION TO PLANNED PARENTHOOD AFTER ROE V. WADE REVERSAL

Apple, Disney, Patagonia, Microsoft and Tesla are just some of the companies that have vowed to help their employees get around abortion bans.

Abortion has an unclear legal status in Texas, where Buffer is based. The state has an abortion trigger law that would outlaw the vast majority of procedures, but it is not set to take effect until 30 days after the Supreme Court hands down its judgment overturning Roe. The court announced its opinion in the Dobbs v. Jackson case in late June, but it is not expected to issue the formal judgment until late July.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE ON FOX BUSINESS

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton sought to ban abortion in the interim through a pre-Roe law on the Texas books. A judge temporarily blocked enforcement of that law last week, following a lawsuit from the ACLU, which argued the law had been repealed and is unenforceable.

Source: Read Full Article