Local election results: When will the local election results be announced, what time?

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On Thursday, May 6, a huge crop of local elections are taking place after some were delayed in 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic. Up for election is 143 English local councils, as well as 129 Members of the Scottish Parliament, 60 Members of the Welsh Senedd, 39 Police and Crime Commissioners, 25 London Assembly seats and 13 directly-elected mayors.

When will we have results?

After polls close, ballot boxes are taken to counting centres where counting staff will sort through millions of votes.

Due to the sheer size of the election and the need to make the process of vote counting Covid-secure will mean results take longer than usual, as safety measures will be needed in different counting venues, which range from fitness centres to town halls, so speed will vary across the country.

Under normal circumstances, the first set of results would be expected around midnight tonight, but these results could stretch into the weekend.

Some results might still emerge overnight on Thursday, including the only Westminster by-election in Hartlepool.

What about the other votes?

Welsh Parliament results could be complete by the end of Friday.

Scottish Parliament, English councils and London results could be announced on Saturday as well.

You might have to wait until Monday to hear the results for Police and Crime Commissioners.

What time are polls open?

The local elections of 2021 will be held on Thursday, May 6. Polls open at 7am and close at 10pm.

How can you vote?

You need to be registered to vote already to take part in the elections today.

There are three ways to vote:

  1. in person at a polling station
  2. by postal vote
  3. by nominating someone to vote for you (a proxy vote)

Can you still get a proxy?

If you can’t vote in person – for example, if you’re self-isolating due to coronavirus – someone can vote for you.

You can tell them who to vote for on your behalf – this is called proxy voting.

You can apply for an emergency proxy subject to certain criteria up until 5pm today, Thursday, May 6.

You may be able to get an emergency proxy vote if:

  • You cannot vote in person because of your employment or a disability.
  • You or your proxy need to self-isolate because of COVID-19.
  • You became aware of the need for a proxy after the proxy deadline.

Head HERE for more information on how to apply for a proxy.

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