Supreme Court agrees to hear cases on NCAA athlete compensation

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The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear two cases regarding whether the NCAA violated antitrust law by limiting the amount of education-related benefits that athletes could procure.

In a Wednesday order, the court said the two cases – American Athletic Conference v. Alston, and National Collegiate Athletic Association v. Alston – will be argued together next year, with one hour for oral arguments.

READ THE COURT ORDER HERE

In May, a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court ruling barring the NCAA from capping education-related compensation and benefits for student-athletes in Division I football and basketball programs. Division I conferences can still independently set their own rules.

In August, Justice Elena Kagan had denied the NCAA’s request to put lower court rulings in favor of the student-athletes on hold at least temporarily while the NCAA formally petitioned the Supreme Court to take up the case.

NCAA VOICES CONCERN ON STUDENT-ATHLETE PERFORMANCE BETS

Alabama punt returner DeVonta Smith (6) returns a punt for a touchdown against Arkansas during the first half of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Dec. 12, 2020, in Fayetteville, Ark. (AP Photo/Michael Woods)

Separately, the NCAA is moving to change its own internal rules to allow third parties to conditionally pay college athletes for things like autographs and endorsements. That is not part of the Supreme Court appeal.

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Former West Virginia football player Shawne Alston first filed suit against the NCAA, SEC, ACC, Big 12, Pac-12 and Big Ten in 2014.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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